Distracted driving makes the news in Ohio — for more than one reason

On Behalf of | May 12, 2021 | Personal Injury

Distracted driving is a major problem out there on the nation’s roads — and everybody knows it. Unfortunately, even those who really should know better are still prone to picking up their cellphones and using them while in their cars.

Take, for example, the recent incident involving an Ohio state senator who was caught participating in a livestreamed meeting while in his vehicle. What made the incident particularly noteworthy is that the livestream was focused on a bill designed to crack down on distracted driving.

What happened during that Zoom call?

Although the senator took pains to conceal the fact that he was in his car by using a background filter, he claims that he was using hands-free audio technology to complete the call and has previously taken Zoom calls while driving.

That may be true, but it doesn’t mean that it’s safe. Keeping a phone out of a driver’s hands only solves part of the problem. Distractions come in three forms:

  • Manual
  • Visual
  • Cognitive

Cellphone use in the car is particularly problematic because it generally combines all three forms of distraction.

Using hands-free technology may (mostly) eliminate the manual distractions once the driver has the Zoom call going, but it doesn’t eliminate the visual distraction that comes with glancing toward the camera. It definitely doesn’t eliminate the cognitive distraction caused by simply taking part in the call.

What happens after a distracted driving accident?

While the senator may be forgiven for his faux pas, the reality is that distracted driving can lead to serious accidents and injuries.

If a distracted driver hit your car, you may end up with significant medical bills, lost wages and other expenses. It’s only fair to hold that driver culpable for their mistakes. An attorney can show you how.